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20121205
20121213
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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
of a fiscal cliff, am i missing something here? can it be such a bad thing. not really said the cbo. if congress extents current policy, the debt and deficit will increase slowing the economy and dramatically increasing interest costs. because of the deal congress and the president made last year it be result in across the board budget reductions, still there will be no decreases in social security, medicare and veteran's benefits. defense spending would take a big hit, but because of a windown in afghanistan some military leaders are asking for less than congress is willing to shell out. from 1990 to 1999 defense spending decreased by 1% a year. this weakened military is nonsense. jim we have like what 27,000 times to blow up the country with the next amount of nukes. >> and we still have massive armies in europe protecting them from a massive soviet union. >> yeah. >> korea is another issue -- we do need people there. >> stephanie: right, but he points out who is behind all of this fiscal cliff cage rattling. the rich and their friends. any changes on the low,
the fiscal cliff to use that terminology. something's going to happen before year end. hopefully it's a comprehensive package that solves our nation's problems then later, next year, we deal with tax reforms in a revenue neutral way. what i -- i'll stop. >> chris: hemorrhaginge >> this goes beyond the deal. why should congress give up it's constitutional authority over borrowing? we looked at your record when george w. bush was president. you voted at least three times against increasing the debt limit. why would congress give up that power? >> the bottom line is on debt ceiling, things shifted. i don't agree with bob corker on that issue. it shifted the way it has on taxes. senator mcconnell put on the floor a resolution that said it was his idea, not ours, that let the president raise the debt ceiling. it's money congress has already spent and let congress by two-thirds override it. he thought we democrats would run from that scared as could be. within a half hour we had 51 votes, we called his bluff and . the sure footed mitch mcconnell stumbled. i believe debt ceiling will be pa
things like the fiscal cliff and the role is something to vote on and so getting back to their districts, some of them say to you having a chance to talk with voters at home is valuable. many of them have fairly packed schedules for events at home but then you have to weigh it against the appearance of people leaving the capitol and does that suggest to people at home they aren't really as nose to the grindstone as they might be? it's an eye of the beholder moment and when you talk about a lame duck congress, here we are with many of these members waiting to have their new colleagues come in this january and tackle some of the big problems and looming deadlines. how do they shake it snout over time we have seen that the lake duck sessions are sometimes not very productive. not a lot going on. but we're certainly heavily focused on it in the last couple of weeks because of the huge problems that need to be tackled. one of the big issues is anybody really talking about what to do with the fiscal cliff other than news conferences an the appearances on the floor and the message is there aren
to go over the fiscal cliff, to use that terminology, something will happen before year end. hopefully, a comprehensive package that solves our nation's problems and then, later, next year we deal with tax reforms in a revenue-neutral way. but i do not want to see us -- go ahead, i'll stop. >> chris: let me bring in senator schumer. and, this goes beyond simply the question of this deal. why should congress give up its constitutional authority over borrowing? you know, we looked at your record, when george w. bush was president, and you voted at least three times against increasing the debt limit. why would congress unilaterally give up that power? >> well the bottom line is, i think on debt ceilings, things have shifted. i don't agree with my good friend, bob corker on the issue. i think it shift the way it has on taxes and we just saw that. senator mcconnell put on the floor a resolution that said, it was his idea, not ours, that let the president raise the debt ceiling, after all it is money congress already spent, and, let congress, by 2/3, override it. he thought we democrats woul
the white house wants as a result of the fiscal cliff deal. they don't want to see a lapse, for instance, in the payroll tax cut. although they'd be fine with it being replaced by something else. unemployment insurance passed, infrastructure spending, those are incentives for the white house to cut a deal on the fiscal cliff as opposed to just going over it and saying, okay, we'll just take the, you know, sequester cuts and bush tax rates. >> that's right, and they were willing to do that in 2010 and were criticized, of course, by the base of the party because they felt so strongly about the stimulus measures. that shows how firmly the president is going to fight for those in the final package. >> i think there's so many reasons why boehner has to take a deal, though, in addition. if you look at the polls, 2 to 1, the public blames the republicans if there is no deal. and he's, meanwhile, gotten his tea party radicals, he's punished them for not following his line and his leadership. so, you know, look at wall street, they so far the market's been up, they seem to be expecting a deal. >>
to go off of the fiscal cliff . so would that be something that would factor in to trying to make progress in the first year of the term? >> yeah, that is a big gammle. it is being. either it is going to work and the republicans are going to come back and negotiate with him. or set us off in another recession and derail the second term before it starts. the president is taking a gammle there. it is posturing now. that is a big issue. either he will get entitlement reform and fiscal cliff done or go off of the tracks and he might not recover from it. >> gretchen: there is another scandal that happened before the election and still out there with a lot of unanswered questions. i am talking about benghazi, libya where four americans were murdered. news that the president may nominate united states un ambassador susan rice to secretary of state. how do you think it will play out? >> nomination fights to begin a second term is not a good thing. fdr needed senate approval and that derailed his first. president bush had the fight with john tower in the first term. not a great way to star
tend to think of this medium and long term risk as the fiscal avalanche. the cliff is something we are approaching now and we can see where it is. we know will hit the cliff. the avalanche is different. the only thing you know about avalanches, you know when the conditions are present. you know when the snowpack has built up to the point where it could happen. you do not know when it is going to happen, you just know it is coming. once it hits you, the avalanche becomes completely impossible to control. do you agree with this characterization about the avalanche? could you elaborate about that kind of threat? >> would you mind if i steal that from you? i will give you credit. i think it is right. i do think -- that is why what you're doing now is so important. this is a once in a generation opportunity for you to nail these things down. we're not that far apart. i really do not think we are. if you are able to put us on a credible path to fiscal sustainability, do it in a balanced way, i think we are golden. i think we will avoid that avalanche. if we do not do that, ultimately, it
, whatever that might be, would be never and he called that chaos. so really it's all about the fiscal cliff, guys. i wish i had something a little more light and fun for you on a monday morning. >> nothing like going through friday's numbers, down to 7.7%. a lot of chatter over the weekend that was only because people were getting out of the workforce in record numbers, et cetera, et cetera. what's your take? what's wall street's take on the numbers on friday? >> reporter: it's like this. it's like i reported on friday. it's better than expected. what we did in our "street signs" was why are the expectations so low? i went through the numbers, back to 2002, ten years ago. 57 months in the past ten years, we have gained more than 200,000 jobs, but now 146,000 is considered good because the expectations are low. so, yes, the number was better than expected but i think as a nation many people we talked to say up to the point where we could add 200,000, 250,000 jobs a month because that will help reduce the deficit. growth is actually the best solution to reducing the deficit. it's not tax hike
have something to do with the fiscal cliff. there's a bit of a slowdown there. the economy is moving along, not as robustly as they'd like it to be, which is why they extend this to make money cheaper. >> what does that mean for businesses in terms of confidence? >> the first gauge we get is to see how markets are doing. there's a bit of a rally on the stock market as a result. you can never trust what happens immediately after these announcements because it could be traders doing things. dow subpoena a quarter there. you can see 27 basis points right now. what it means is the same thing it meant until now. we have long-term low interest rates. it's cheap to borrow money in america. it's not necessarily easy it to borrow money. lending standards are still high, and many businesses as we have seen that either have cash or access to credit are not making decisions until they have some certainty about what government is going to do. we may get that certainty as soon as we get a fiscal cliff deal, maybe january or february by the time we know what will happen. that could work. if everybo
on this fiscal cliff. you know, when people tell you oh, it's very complicated, don't believe it. don't believe it. it's not complicated. there are several parts to this fiscal cliff. the biggest one is that the bush-era tax cuts are expiring on 100% of the people, and if they expire, it means people will have to pay more in taxes at a time when we don't want them to have to struggle. we want them to have disposable income because it's good for their families and it's good for the economy, it's good for business, it's good for economic growth. the bush-era tax cuts are expiring on december 31. why don't we find the common ground, get rid of that issue, get those tax cuts to the 98% of the middle class that need them and fight about the millionaires and the billionaires later? they are okay. they are just fine. and if we were to do that, that simple step -- and that means passing our bill that we passed on july 25. we did it. it's done. we don't have to worry about -- we did our job over here. we got the votes. pick it up and pass it over there. now, i understand that democratic leader pelosi ha
's not what the american people thought the fiscal cliff was about. they thought it was about trying to have something to force us, force our congress and our president to do something about the deficit and debt situation. everything they're talking about will make it worse. >> what's the answer? will we have the deal? >> the real answer is to have comprehensive. look at this. i as a republican, i would take raising the rates on the two top brackets if, in return, we had tax reform laid out over a period of months, if we had entitlement reform. we have to control defense spending. we have to control other no non- -- other discretionary non-defense spending. i think if you have the whole package, i would hold my nose despite the fact raising those two tax brackets is bad economics, bad for jobs, will hurt the economy, i would hold my nose to get the other done. what i wouldn't do is vote for that and do nothing else. >> agree completely. what i've been saying here. steve rattner. >> i agree completely. to get a big deal we all have to hold our nose a little bit and accept things we don't want
, for political reasons. so, the way i sigh it is right now he's focusing on the fiscal cliff. he will have to give in on entitlement issues and up to him to focus on how to make the left happy and do something with labor. a natural constituency. it will come after him if he doesn't do something about it. i think right now good politics on the issue. >> yeah, no. i tend to agree with that. he just has to show up. he wasn't as in the speech today as sort as explicit as i was led to believe this morning and the white house made it clear where he stands on this. i'm fascinated, also, by the politics of this within michigan and when's happening in michigan because this law which, you know, the final vote in the legislature will be tomorrow and the expectation is the republican governor will sign it and changes the political culture and just the working culture of michigan. talk about the right to work laws used to be just south carolina, used to be the old confederacy. to have it spread to the rust belt is dramatic. the story is governor rick snyder, republican governor, hard to believe now but
. it is not something still lingering in the senate. it is in the house. the issue of the fiscal cliff, what's it mean? it is probably the most known phrase in politics. they say, you have to wait for everything. people understand you have to do a piece of the puzzle. you can do it today. the opportunity to keep this economy moving, it has done very well the last few years. we always wait for the big deal and something never happens. this is a chance for the middle class tax cut. i would encourage every day, what is holding it out? -- it up? you will see yourself getting a tax cut for the remainder of next year if we just move them forward. again, it is finished of the senate side. >> i want to thank my colleagues for the leadership on the steering committee in this area. we have senator olympia snowe, bill kristol of the weekly standard, like simpson of idaho. david brooks. walter jones. the national review. we're here to say that passing the middle class tax cut is the right thing to do. you don't need to take our word for it. 2/3 of the american public agree with us. you don't need to take that wor
a 39.6%. that's the washington post this morning. below that, governors say the fiscal cliff would hurt their states' economies. several governors met at the white house yesterday and with political leaders to say something needs to be done or their economies and on the state level will be heard. -- be hurt. let's go to walter in new jersey, independent caller. good morning. caller: good morning. i don't know what's wrong with these people, because they have to come to some kind of agreement. the gop has to give ground, taxes wouldybody's go up just to save 2%. it just does not cut it. it is a bad move politically and bad for the country. host: polloi in johnsonville, virginia. -- floyd. caller: i was thinking about the fiscal cliff. i don't think that's the problem at. the problem is when we fell off the moral cliff. our president said gay marriage was ok. and america killing so many babies. side,e get back on god's everything else will take care of itself. that's the way it is. a guy said it seemed like christians are down and out. let me tell you, christians are the happiest people t
this fiscal cliff thing obviously everybody's talking about oh we've gotta cut the entitlements like medicare. you've been pointing out something for awhile that we don't have a medicare problem. we have a healthcare cost problem. explain please, healthcare geek. >> this is one of the things people should really pay attention to because the healthcare crisis in this country gets so complicate and convoluted that people tune it out and then the republicans have this incredible opportunity to swoop in and make stuff up. we don't have a medicare problem. we have a healthcare cost problem. there is no competition in the healthcare market place right now. >> stephanie: right. >> okay. and people make money in the healthcare industry when prices go up. >> right. >> corporations make money when prices go up. we're talking about medical device manufacturers, drug companies, health insurance companies, they all make money the higher the prices are. they have no incentive to work for the public good. their incent sieve t
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)